Archive for the ‘Favorite Characters’ Category

Essay On Qui-Gon

March 26, 2017

This was posted on Future of the Force on St. Paddy’s Day but I didn’t see it until now:

Qui-Gon Jinn. The wisest of Jedi, and an advocate of the living Force. A critical voice to the Republic’s Jedi Council. A voice in the wilderness, in a period increasingly dominated by bureaucracy, rules and regulation. Qui-Gon was convinced that Anakin was the Chosen One, the one who would bring balance back to the Force.

Essay Defends Mace Windu

March 18, 2017

Everyone’s favorite bad mo-fo Jedi Master gets some love from this Crossing Sabers essay:

We would expect the Jedi to commune with the Force in order to divine what purpose or action they should apply the clone army to, but instead we see them rush into battle and try to squelch the fledgling Separatist movement with sheer force. When you combine this with Mace’s acknowledgment that their ability to use the Force has diminished, we get our next key: Mace is trying the best he can even though he can see the foundations of the Jedi starting to crumble.

New Qui-Gon Figure Coming From SH Figurarts

March 16, 2017

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SH Figuarts announced it is putting out a Qui-Gon 6″ figure in August. Look for pre-orders soon!

Fates Of Characters & “Canon”: A Really Short Commentary

February 28, 2017

The most recent novel in Del Rey’s post-2014 continuity reveals the fate of a particular prequel character. You can go look it up if you want. I haven’t read the book and don’t intend to. In any case, I suppose it is funny that it’s “canon” this particular character survived as long as he did, past the OT era, though I’ve noticed some complaints as to where this character ended up. All my humble opinion is that if it’s in a book, it just doesn’t matter. For now the movies can’t contradict this storyline but you have to remember, a company owns Star Wars now and what’s canon today outside of Lucas’s six movies may not be “canon” tomorrow. Since 1977, Lucasfilm has deep-sixed at least two tracks of outside-the-movies canon. The whole Marvel run from 1977 to 1986 was declared apocrypha. “Splinter of the Mind’s Eye” is apocrypha. The Brian Daley Han Solo books are apocrypha. So are the L. Neil What’s His Name Lando Calrissian books. I don’t even think “The Star Wars Holiday Special” was ever “canon.” Those crazy kids’ books with Trioculus, Han’s floating house and the Space Pirate Boogie, Mount Yoda, and Ken The Fresh Jedi Prince of Bel Air? Not canon either, even if they started after the second wave of “canon” that arrived with “Heir To The Empire” and “Dark Empire.” Dark Horse’s stuff superceded Marvel’s stuff, while Marvel has chosen to reboot the entire comic world timeline when it got the ball back in 2015. Bantam’s stuff overrode the paperbacks of the ‘70s and ‘80s. The second wave was based on West End Games’s roleplaying game, which isn’t canon anymore either. The prequels actually made a lot of the stuff produced post 1990 inaccurate or obsolete. Various episodes of the Clone Wars freely contradicted various books and comics, much to EU fans’ annoyance. Then it was reboot time again in 2014.

All it takes is another company purchase, corporate merger, or changing of the guards within the company to open the possibility again of “rebooting” the books and comics. Someone decides the way things are going are not to that person’s liking and poof, everything changes. If book sales were to slump, the suits are going to demand changes to bring sales back up again. It’s just how it is.

So when you read these things, read them for your own enjoyment and don’t get too invested in them.

“In Defense Of Padmé Amidala”

February 19, 2017

LadyFromPlanetX forwarded an old Geek Dad post that I missed somehow but it’s really good.  If you can stand another defense of Padmé, you really ought to read it:

My favorite rule in chess is the one where a pawn advances to a higher piece if it manages to cross the whole board. Padmé starts the game as a queen. In The Phantom Menace and The Attack of the Clones she plays an aggressively defensive game. In Revenge of the Sith she becomes cornered and chooses to sacrifice herself to protect her king, Anakin.

In A New Hope Luke enters the game as a pawn. He is talented but untrained and impetuous. For every win there is also a loss, but the other pieces protect him because they know if he makes it across the board, they have their best chance at winning it all. In Return of the Jedi, when Luke refuses to be Palpatine’s pawn — the way his father had been all these years — he becomes a knight. And in doing so, in making the same choice Padmé made on the day of his birth, he catches Palpatine in his own trap. Anakin is free to win the game.

Regal Gown A-Line Dress

February 17, 2017

Independent fan fashion is showing more love for the prequels.  LadyJediScientist found this dress on Redbubble:

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Yours for $65.00 but Redbubble has frequent discount promotions.  You can also get leggings with the same design from the same shop.

Hint, hint licensees and retailers:  fans will fill in the missing gaps.

“The Case For Padme”

February 16, 2017

Power To The Prequels is back again at RetroZap, this time with an essay celebrating Padme, a character who doesn’t get the proper respect in fandom or in the media:

Padme’s stubborn refusal to lose all hope in the face of overwhelming despair and her steadfast loyalty to a man who has physically abused her is often used as evidence of her weakness as a character. And yet doesn’t Luke do the same thing in Return of the Jedi when he discards his weapon in the presence of the most powerful Sith in the galaxy and the abusive father who cut off his hand and kicked the crap out of him? How can Padme’s sacrifice be written off as weak, while Luke’s is bravery? They are the same thing. Luke is Padme’s child. Her spirit, her fearlessness and her loyalty live on in him.

Let me just add something here, not about the essay per se but about the things I link. If I don’t like a piece for whatever reason I don’t bother linking to it at all. If I think the piece makes a lot of good points, I do link to it even if I don’t agree with everything that’s in the piece. This particular one does have a little bit of a partisan POV and it’s not one I’m necessarily endorsing. Read Rules of the House on that issue.

Essay: “You Wear The Chains You Forge”

February 2, 2017

Clashing Sabers posted a pretty good piece about Anakin and Darth Vader.  This centers on the idea Vader is essentially stuck in his own trap:

When we meet a young Anakin Skywalker in Episode I, he is desperately trying to be seen not as a slave but as a person. Ironically, and sadly, the same can be said for Darth Vader. He knows that the Emperor sees him as a tool, and he hates himself for it. He wants to be known for who he really is, but the Emperor has just placed him off to the side until he is of use. Again, he has become a slave.

Darth Maul Comic Variant Covers, Interview

January 5, 2017

star wars.com posted an interview with the writer of the upcoming “Darth Maul” comic Cullen Bunn and introduced several variant covers:

This series takes place shortly before the events of The Phantom Menace. We’re following Darth Maul at a point when his anxiousness, his impatience, and his thirst for vengeance against the Jedi is at an all-time high.

He’s growing frustrated. He’s been taught to hate the Jedi. He’s been trained to kill them. But his master, Darth Sidious, has told him to bide his time, to keep himself hidden. This is driving Maul crazy, so we see him venting his anger by testing his skills against some of the nastiest creatures and cutthroats in the galaxy. During one of his missions, though, he learns something of interest. A powerful crime lord has captured a Jedi Padawan, and only a few people know about it.

Maul sees this as an opportunity to test his mettle against those he hates, so he sets out to find this Jedi. He has to operate in secret, though, because his master would not approve.

#1 hits February 1.

It’s A Jar Jar Kind of Christmas

December 24, 2016

…Because I’ve got two relevant posts on everyone’s favorite clumsy Gungan.

First, this at PopWrapped on ideas for future Star Wars spinoff films.  Who wouldn’t want to see a whole flick dedicated to Jar Jar?

Then there’s matril’s post “In Defense Of The Underfrog”:

It’s more fun to laugh than to hate. Are Jar Jar’s clumsy hijinks rather silly and childish? Yeah, maybe. It’s not like there weren’t juvenile gags and slapstick humor in the original trilogy. And honestly, there’s so much darkness coming in Episode III (hardly any Jar Jar there at all) that I’ll take all the silly laughter I can get. Episode I, in many ways, is about the innocence of childhood. Anakin is about to have it ripped away from him. Let’s enjoy some goofy fun before it’s gone, for heaven’s sake.