Posts Tagged ‘Saga’

Star Words Part II

March 24, 2017

Matril has posted the second part of her “Star Words” series:

He is a dutiful, deferent Padawan to Qui-Gon, clearly respectful of his master’s teachings but not opposed to raising questions now and then. We see this in their opening scene, as they discuss Obi-Wan’s elusive “bad feeling” (and I love all the “I have a bad feeling” lines, but since they’re not unique to the prequels, there’s no need to discuss them here) and explore how to follow Yoda’s advice about being mindful of the future, without neglecting the living Force.

Read the rest here!

Rebels, Canon, & Confusion

March 20, 2017

If you haven’t seen last Saturday’s “Rebels,” this contains spoilers:

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SWCO Art For Prequel Fans

March 15, 2017

Art show exclusives for SWCO were revealed today (the artists themselves were announced in January) and it looks like just about everything is TFA, Rogue One, or a tribute to Carrie Fisher.  But if you’re going to the con or a really nice friend of yours is picking up a piece for you, here are the PT-related pieces that might interest you:

“Watchful Guardian” by Chris Dee:

Watchful-Guardian-by-Chris-Dee

Jason Palmer:

Jason-Palmer

Jeff Carlisle:

Jeff-Carlisle-NOT-FINAL

“Jango’s Finest” by Joe Hogan:

 

Jangos-Finest-by-Joe-Hogan

Matt Busch:

Matt-Busch

Randy Martinez:

 

Randy-Martinez

Ahsoka fans should check out art from Lin Zy Busch and Danny Haas (Rebels era).  There’s one all Rebels piece from Alex Buechel.  Acme/Dark Ink will likely have pre-orders soon; the piece has to be picked up at the con.

 

Fates Of Characters & “Canon”: A Really Short Commentary

February 28, 2017

The most recent novel in Del Rey’s post-2014 continuity reveals the fate of a particular prequel character. You can go look it up if you want. I haven’t read the book and don’t intend to. In any case, I suppose it is funny that it’s “canon” this particular character survived as long as he did, past the OT era, though I’ve noticed some complaints as to where this character ended up. All my humble opinion is that if it’s in a book, it just doesn’t matter. For now the movies can’t contradict this storyline but you have to remember, a company owns Star Wars now and what’s canon today outside of Lucas’s six movies may not be “canon” tomorrow. Since 1977, Lucasfilm has deep-sixed at least two tracks of outside-the-movies canon. The whole Marvel run from 1977 to 1986 was declared apocrypha. “Splinter of the Mind’s Eye” is apocrypha. The Brian Daley Han Solo books are apocrypha. So are the L. Neil What’s His Name Lando Calrissian books. I don’t even think “The Star Wars Holiday Special” was ever “canon.” Those crazy kids’ books with Trioculus, Han’s floating house and the Space Pirate Boogie, Mount Yoda, and Ken The Fresh Jedi Prince of Bel Air? Not canon either, even if they started after the second wave of “canon” that arrived with “Heir To The Empire” and “Dark Empire.” Dark Horse’s stuff superceded Marvel’s stuff, while Marvel has chosen to reboot the entire comic world timeline when it got the ball back in 2015. Bantam’s stuff overrode the paperbacks of the ‘70s and ‘80s. The second wave was based on West End Games’s roleplaying game, which isn’t canon anymore either. The prequels actually made a lot of the stuff produced post 1990 inaccurate or obsolete. Various episodes of the Clone Wars freely contradicted various books and comics, much to EU fans’ annoyance. Then it was reboot time again in 2014.

All it takes is another company purchase, corporate merger, or changing of the guards within the company to open the possibility again of “rebooting” the books and comics. Someone decides the way things are going are not to that person’s liking and poof, everything changes. If book sales were to slump, the suits are going to demand changes to bring sales back up again. It’s just how it is.

So when you read these things, read them for your own enjoyment and don’t get too invested in them.

Filoni: Prequels Important To Today’s SW

February 18, 2017

Comic Book.com has a short interview with Dave Filoni where he discusses why the prequels are relevant to today’s Star Wars stories:

“I think it works into what the struggle is. You want to achieve this balance or you want to become … I think it’s a natural part of it, and really the introduction of this idea of balance comes from the prequels,” Filoni told ComicBook.com. “That’s where the prophecy of the chosen one and ‘the one who will bring balance,’ as quoted by Mace Windu, really comes from. So, I find that very interesting because the prequels add a tremendous amount of depth to all these things, especially ways of the Force. The people, I don’t think realize that that’s where it comes from, but it’s not something that’s natural to the original trilogy. It’s something that stems from the prequels, which added a tremendous amount to what we know about Star Wars.”

20 Years Of The Star Wars Special Editions: A Commentary

February 4, 2017

specialeditionposter

January 31, 2017 marked an important but often overlooked anniversary in the long pop culture history of Star Wars. It’s the 20th anniversary of the Star Wars Special Editions, the first of which (ANH) was released in theaters January 31, 1997. TESB followed on February 21 and ROTJ on March 14. As is often the case with anything having to do with modern fandom and “geek” media, too much attention has been paid to the controversies and not enough on how really important those three months were in 1997. (For the record, I take the Harrison Ford position on the “who shot first” issue: I don’t care. I happen to think the 2004 DVD cut had the best version of the scene.)

1996’s “multimedia event” “Shadows Of The Empire” was a dress rehearsal for the Special Editions which in turn were a dress rehearsal for the prequels. Lucasfilm was riding a wave of resurgent popularity and this was to keep the momentum going while at the same time stretching muscles at everywhere from PR to licensing to ILM’s visual effects department that hadn’t been used for a long time, or at least not coordinated together since ROTJ’s release in 1983. But let me be clear: this wasn’t top-down manipulation.  There had been a renaissance of interest in Star Wars beginning in the early ’90s.  Moviegoers missed Star Wars. They missed the excitement those movies brought.  Meanwhile, there was a younger generation of fans whose only experience with Star Wars was on the boob tube. They yearned to see Star Wars the way God and Lucas intended them, on the big screen. They wanted to camp out on the sidewalk like fans did in the early ‘80s and dress up in costumes. They wanted to cheer with a big audience. Some of the most memorable ads for the Special Editions were aimed directly at that audience. Remember the one that started with the tinny sound and the X-wings on a little t.v. before it burst out onto the screen? It was genius.

This is why I had no doubts at all about the Special Editions succeeding. To a lot of the media, it seemed “risky” and a “gamble.” Why would people go to the theaters to pay to see movies that had been out on cable, network television, and home video for years? It seemed absurd. But Star Wars was different and at that time in 1997, there was a perfect storm ready to break out and astonish the world.

ANH:  SE had a shocking $35 million opening weekend, which set a record for a January opening and remains one of the biggest January openings even 20 years later.  It sat at the top of the box office for three weeks, racking up $138.6 million in its entire run and passing “E.T. The Extraterrestrial” to become the top-grossing film of all time (domestic) until James Cameron and Leonardo DiCaprio ruined everything a year later.  The three existing Star Wars film grossed a total of $447 million worldwide during their combined run.  That’s right…movies that were 14-20 years old made as much money if not more than just about every newly made hit released in 1997.

As per usual, complaining fans didn’t see the trees for the forest, preferring to dither on what was changed and how that made Lucas a horrible person.  It’s like your team wins the Super Bowl or the World Series and all you could do is complain about your team’s ugly uniforms and how much you hate the coach while everyone else around you is celebrating.  It probably indicated what was coming with the prequels.

But the Special Editions were a triumph for Star Wars and for George Lucas.  They proved that Star Wars was a permanent part of the cultural landscape and they introduced the theatrical experience to a new generation of fans.  In fact, the experience of seeing the films on the big screen after so many years and noticing how much was lost watching them on a t.v. influenced this fan to see the prequels as many times in the theater as possible when they were released.  The hype for new Star Wars films went into overdrive.  In fact, one could say this was the beginning of the prequel era.  I think TPM would’ve been a success even without the Special Editions but they probably would’ve had to have worked a lot harder to make the film an event.  The Special Editions pre-sold that audience two years in advance and built the excitement to make TPM the movie event of the decade.

This article has all of the info on how the Special Editions performed, making the process of writing this a lot easier and faster.  

 

 

 

Open Thread: Ep VIII Title Suddenly Drops

January 23, 2017

Perhaps against my better judgment, here’s an open thread on the suddenly revealed title of Ep VIII, “The Last Jedi.”  (I’m not linking this on the FB page because it’ll get too crazy there.)

My only thing is this, it’s obviously not Lucas’s style of nomenclature nor is there the same sense of rhyme as there was with his movies:

A New Hope <–> The Phantom Menace

The Empire Strikes Back <–> Attack Of The Clones

Return Of The Jedi <–> Revenge Of The Sith

I know this is nitpick theater but if I pay attention to those kinds of details, I don’t know why no one else can.  But of course, what ultimately matters is how the film turns out…

Essay: “Star Wars Mysteries”

January 16, 2017

Power To The Prequels at Retrozap is back with a new piece, “The Wonder of Wondering:  Star Wars Mysteries In The Prequels.”  It’s a look at the answers and many questions the prequels presented:

As fans we should be able to make up our own minds about these things. Lucas created Star Wars in part to teach children about empathy and values, but also to encourage their imaginations and inspire them. We must be willing to at least tolerate different interpretations of the saga and different theories on the parts of our fellow fans. Doggedly pursuing one incontrovertible record about the sequence of events and history of the Star Wars galaxy misses the larger point of these stories and the lessons they are trying to impart.

The fun of Star Wars is ultimately the opportunity to use our own imaginations to fill in the blanks. But what happens when there are no more blanks to fill in, when there is no room in the galaxy for our imagination because all these stories have been told?

In Case You Haven’t Seen It…

January 5, 2017

Sure, you’ve probably seen it already if you halfway care about “Rebels” but the mid-season trailer promises some PT/CW-era familiar faces…first of which is Saw Gererra this Saturday.

A Video On Prequel References In Rogue One

January 2, 2017

“Rogue One” Easter eggs and references are like Pokemon…you gotta catch ’em all.  This video lays out all of the prequel references in the film, courtesy of The Star Wars Prequels Channel :